Found a fawn?

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The advice on this website is meant to be information that you can use at your own discretion. Please call us if you still have questions or have any other concerns. View the full disclaimer.

Fawns, like many other wild animal babies, are frequently hidden and left alone for hours by their mothers while they forage for food. For the first couple of weeks, these babies generally nap while waiting for their mothers to return. They lay very still so as not to attract predators, and are frequently mistaken for being in distress or abandoned. If roaming about, they may appear to be weak and stumbling, and actually be newly born. Their mothers are usually within visual range, and can always hear if their baby cries out. When a fawn is removed by humans or a predator, the doe will continue to look for it for two to three days, continually returning to the area where she last left the baby.

Contact us if

  • A fawn is found curled up next to a dead doe
  • If crying out (bleating) for hours
  • If it has diarrhea, maggots, severe scrapes or deep puncture wounds
  • If severely dehydrated
  • If its body temperature is extremely low
  • If something is broken
  • If found lying on its side with outstretched limbs